Gab at the Lab: Don MacGorman

Don MacGorman, Senior Research Scientist

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Background:Ph.D. Space Physics and Astronomy, Rice University
M.S. Space Physics and Astronomy, Rice University
B.A. Physics, Rice University
Experience:Don was born and raised in Fort Worth, Texas. Aside from his 4th grade year, which he spent in Durham, North Carolina, and his 11th grade year, spent in Beirut, Lebanon, Don’s entire childhood took place in Texas. He remained in the state for college, earning his bachelor’s, Master’s, and Ph.D. at Rice University in Houston, where his graduate research focused on using recordings of thunder to map where lightning occurred in a hailstorm. Don came to Norman in 1978 as a postdoctoral researcher.
What He Does:Don began working with NSSL in 1978, first as a postdoctoral research with OU CIMMS, and then as a National Research Council postdoc. Since December 2000, Don has been a Federal research scientist with the Lab. He currently serves as the Storm Electricity Team Leader in the Warning Research Development Division. Using the Lightning Strike Locating System, his team conducts studies on positive cloud-to-ground detection. Recently, the longest lightning bolt ever recorded was found to extend almost 200 miles across the state of Oklahoma. The bolt occurred during a thunderstorm on June 20, 2007.
Trivia: Don is the son of a Canadian father and a Texan mother. His wife and two daughters all hold Master’s degrees in music. In his free time, Don enjoys reading, gardening, strength training, music, and he has recently taken up ballroom dancing.
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Gab at the Lab: Alexander Ryzhkov

Alexander Ryzhkov, Senior Research Scientist (CIMMS/NSSL)

Background:Ph.D. Radio Science, St. Petersburg University (1977)
M.S. Physics, St. Petersburg University (1974)
Experience:Alexander Ryzhkov grew up in Russia, in a small city called Valday, Novgorod Oblast. He attended St. Petersburg University, where he earned degrees in both physics and radio science. After completing his Ph.D. program, Alexander worked at Russia’s Main Geophysical Observatory from 1978 to 1992. During this time, he networked with scientists in Norman, and was eventually invited to come to NSSL as a National Research Council postdoctoral researcher.
What He Does:Alexander was an NRC postdoc at NSSL from 1992 to 1995. He then accepted a research scientist position with OU’s Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, where he has remained for over 20 years. Alexander’s primary research goals are developing operational algorithms for quantitative precipitation estimation, hydrometeor classification, and microphysical retrievals using polarimetric radars, and utilizing polarimetric radars for the improvement of Numerical Weather Prediction model performance. To achieve these objectives, he works to break down walls between radar scientists and cloud modelers and capitalizes on the benefits of international collaboration.
Trivia: Alexander’s favorite pastimes include walking in the woods, strolling the streets of European cities, spending hours in art galleries, and relaxing with some music. He enjoys spending time with his family, which includes his wife, two daughters, and a son.
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Gab at the Lab: Derek Stratman

Derek Stratman, NRC Postdoc

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Background:Ph.D. Meteorology, University of Oklahoma (2016)
M.S. Meteorology, University of Oklahoma (2011)
B.S. Meteorology, Valparaiso University (2009)
Experience:Derek was born and raised in Jasper, Indiana, best known for Strassenfest, an annual summer festival celebrating German heritage and culture. He attended Valparaiso University in his home state, earning his bachelor’s degree in meteorology. Then, he moved to Norman to continue his education at the University of Oklahoma. He earned both his Master’s and Ph.D. in meteorology at OU before accepting a National Research Council Postdoc position with NSSL’s Warn-on-Forecast group.
What He Does:Derek began working with the Warn-on-Forecast group in August 2016. His current research is focused on alleviating storm displacement errors in storm-scale forecasts. Previously, he had been an OU graduate research assistant. He worked with NSSL from 2009 to 2011, looking at storm-scale model verification. From 2011 to 2016, he worked with the Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms on improving storm-scale modeling and data assimilation techniques. He also took part in several field experiments. In 2010, he participated in the Verification of the Origin of Rotation of Tornadoes Experiment 2 (VORTEX2), assisting with mobile mesonet operations and taking surface observations. In 2013, Derek helped coordinate data collection for the Mesoscale Predictability Experiment (MPEX).
Trivia: Derek and his wife recently had their first child. In his free time, Derek enjoys several hobbies, including photography, storm chasing, astronomy, camping/hiking, playing trumpet, and sports.

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NOAA Research grants support continued tornado research in the Southeast

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A study of tornadoes in the southeastern United States begins its second year this month as NOAA Research announces awards of $2.5 million in grants presented to partner institutions.

Scientists from more than 20 organizations are part of VORTEX-Southeast, a program to understand how environmental factors characteristic of the southeastern United States affect the formation, intensity, structure and path of tornadoes in this region. VORTEX-SE researchers will also determine the best methods for communicating forecast uncertainty related to these events to the public, and evaluate public response.

NOAA is supporting research in three main areas:  improving forecast models, addressing risk awareness and response, and observing and modeling tornadic storms and their environments. A list of all the grants is available here: http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/projects/vortexse/supported-2017/

4362photo-2017vortexgrants-texas-tech-researcher-vanna-chmielewski-prepares-to-launch-a-weather-balloon-near-storms-in-northern-alabama-credit-keli-pirtle-noaaThis past spring, researchers spent about seven days during a two-month period gathering data on storms around Huntsville, Alabama,  using an armada of instruments. They targeted a range of weather situations from multiple rapidly evolving supercell thunderstorms to days when anticipated storms failed to develop. A similar field experiment is planned for spring 2017.

With a year’s worth of data in hand, researchers are gaining insights into how to study storms in the southeast, which has a very different terrain from the Great Plains, said Erik Rasmussen, VORTEX-SE project manager and research scientist for the University of Oklahoma’s Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies working at the NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory.

4361photo-2017vortexgrants-erik-rasmussen-vortex-se-project-manager-speaks-during-media-day-kicking-off-the-spring-2016-field-research-campaign-credit-keli-pirtle-noaa1“We now have a tremendous amount of information about what we can and can’tobserve in the southeastern environment, and an understanding of how to move forward from here. We know what to expect and how to observe it, ” Rasmussen said. “We’ve learned a lot in the social science related studies as well — where we should focus our attention to answer the critical questions of how weather information is used and how people respond.”

VORTEX-SE activities are supported by special Congressional allocations of more than $10 million to NOAA made in 2015 and 2016.

Contact: Keli Pirtle, National Severe Storms Laboratory, (405) 325-6933, keli.pirtle@noaa.gov

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Q&A with Pam Heinselman

Pam HeinselmanNSSL scientist Pamela Heinselman recently transitioned from our Radar Research Development Division to the Forecast Research Development Division, marking a significant shift in her area of focus. Heinselman has been a research scientist with the Lab since March 2009 and received a Presidential Early Career Award for Science and Engineering in 2009 as well. Previously, she was a collaborator with OU’s Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, where her efforts centered on developing phased array radar through experiments in NOAA’s Hazardous Weather Testbed.

While radar research has long been her passion, Heinselman was ready for a new challenge. For many years, her research concentrated on warning and forecast applications of weather radars. Now, she is applying that experience to develop Warn on Forecast, a program aiming to increase tornado, severe thunderstorm, and flash flood warning lead times.

We sat down with her to get her take on how radar and forecasting work together at NSSL.

Q: What inspired you to make the switch to the Warn-on-Forecast group? What do you hope to accomplish in this new role?

A: What inspired me was the opportunity to engage in new challenges, to be immersed in and learn more about this exciting research area, and to contribute to the success of the Warn-on-Forecast program through my skills and experience.

What I hope to accomplish is to work with our in-house scientists and OAR labs and National Weather Service partners at National Centers and local offices to advance and eventually transfer to operations a cutting-edge forecast system that ultimately improves the ability of individuals, families, and communities to protect their lives and property.

Q: How is your position in FRDD related to your work with radar?

A: My position in FRDD is related to my work with radar in several ways. Most importantly, like Phased Array Radar, the Warn-on-Forecast system under development is cutting-edge technology. While Phased Array Radar is introducing adaptive rapid-radar scanning as a potential replacement for the WSR-88D, Warn-on-Forecast is introducing frequently updating, probabilistic high-impact weather forecast guidance as an integral part of a forecasting paradigm shift, known as Forecasting a Continuum of Environmental Threats (FACETS). Another connection is the Warn-on-Forecast program’s exploration of benefits from assimilating legacy and rapid-scan dual-polarization radar data in these model forecasts.

Q: In your Phased Array Radar Innovative Sensing Experiment, you used eye tracking technology to analyze forecaster decision-making. How will the results of this research be useful in developing Warn-on-Forecast?

A: The results of the eye tracking experiment will shed light on forecaster cognitive processes that will aid the development of forecast visualization techniques optimized for the needs of operational forecasters. Additionally, since currently forecasts rely heavily on radar data in their warning decision process, results of the experiment will help to bridge the use of weather radar data with the use of probabilistic forecast guidance in operations.

Q: What do you see as the biggest challenges and opportunities for radar and forecasting research?

A: One of the biggest challenges for radar and forecasting research is finding creative solutions to known technological issues, such as matching co-polar radar cross-sections, reducing model error, and attaining the computational resources needed for forecasting systems with 1-km or smaller grid spacing.

At the same time, one of the biggest opportunities for radar and forecasting research is to revolutionize the frequency and specificity of high-impact weather observations and forecasts to ultimately provide decision makers with more timely guidance that improves their ability to take protective action well in advance of life-threatening events.

Q: How will Warn-on-Forecast address the need for greater lead time and more accurate weather forecasts?

A: Warn-on-Forecast will address the need for greater lead time and more accurate weather forecasts by producing frequently updated, well-calibrated probabilistic 0 to 6 hour convective-scale analyses and forecast guidance that support high-impact forecast and warning operations within NOAA.

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New research improves water hazard forecasting

Stream radar is a new tool to monitor stream levels and improve the prediction of flooding. Credit: J.J. Gourley/ NOAA
Stream radar is a new tool to monitor stream levels and improve the prediction of flooding. Credit: J.J. Gourley/ NOAA

A new program supported by NOAA’s National Severe Storms Laboratory is testing the use of stream radar to provide better measurements of stream flow and improve flood forecasting. The project, led by electronics engineer Daniel Wasielewski with the University of Oklahoma’s Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, began in October 2016 and will span two years. NSSL research hydrologist JJ Gourley is collaborating, along with Edward Clark from NOAA’s National Water Center and John Fulton with the United State Geological Survey.

The stream radar project was borne out of a need for improved river monitoring. NOAA’s National Water Model, which became operational in June 2016, forecasts river conditions at substantially more locations than had previously been possible. The United States Geological Survey operates roughly 7,800 stream gauges in the United States, with observations critical to informing forecasters, who rely on the data to verify flood projections. Stream radars are less likely to be lost during a flood, and also have less stringent requirements for annual maintenance, power, and access. Stage and velocity levels calculated by radars will be assimilated into the NWM, and serve as additional verification points for hydrologic forecasts.

Researchers positioning stream radar above Honey Creek in Davis, Oklahoma. Credit: J.J. Gourley/ NOAA
Researchers positioning stream radar above Honey Creek in Davis, Oklahoma. Credit: J.J. Gourley/ NOAA

The NSSL/OU research team plans to install 14 stream radars on cables or bridges across rivers at predetermined, high-priority locations. Installations will take place through 2017, with results expected in early- to mid-2018. To support retrievals performed by stream radars, NSSL will also provide in-house development of a scanning lidar to produce bathymetric measurements.

Earlier this week, NOAA Research announced it would invest $6 million in programs to improve severe weather and water hazards forecasting. The stream radar program is included in this initiative, marking a significant breakthrough in NOAA’s research-to-operations efforts.

To learn more:
http://go.usa.gov/xkf8j

 

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Gab at the Lab: Yunheng Wang

Yunheng Wang, Research Scientist (CIMMS/NSSL)

yunheng-wang

Background:Ph.D. Computer Sciences, University of Oklahoma (2007)
M.S. Meteorology, University of Maryland (2000)
B.S. Meteorology, Nanjing Institute of Meteorology (1993)
Experience:Yunheng grew up in northeastern China and attended Nanjing Institute of Meteorology (now renamed as Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology). He began his career with the China Meteorological Administration before moving to the United States, where he earned his Master’s degree at the University of Maryland. From Maryland, Yunheng made his way to Norman, earning his Ph.D. in computer sciences at the University of Oklahoma. He worked with OU’s Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms as a research scientist/software manager, then was offered a position with OU CIMMS. He has been a member of the Warn-on-Forecast team since October 2015.
What He Does:Yunheng's work is concentrated on the Warn-on-Forecast project. He develops software running on supercomputers for atmospheric applications. He also uses data assimilation techniques (3D/4D variational method, EnKF, LETKF, etc.) to conduct radar and satellite data analysis. In addition, he is working with numerical weather prediction models, including WRF, NMMB, the Advanced Regional Prediction System, and the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System. Yunheng enjoyed taking part in the 2016 Hazardous Weather Testbed experiments focusing on 3DVAR analysis and the WRF prediction system.
Trivia: Yunheng has many interests, including reading (particularly ancient history), movies, and travel. He is not an avid sports fan, but encourages his two boys to be involved in athletics.
Fun Fact: Wang is the largest surname in China, with over 92 million people sharing the name!

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Gab at the Lab: Heather Reeves

Heather Reeves, Research Associate (CIMMS/NSSL)

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Background:Ph.D. Meteorology, North Carolina State University
M.S. Meteorology, North Carolina State University
B.S. Meteorology, Central Michigan University
Experience:Heather was born in Hemlock, Michigan, where she lived until her family relocated in-state to Mt. Pleasant. She grew up with an interest in music, but quickly discovered the competitive lifestyle did not suit her personality. Instead, she elected to pursue a degree in meteorology at Central Michigan University. Upon graduation, she and her husband decided to continue their education, and moved to Raleigh, North Carolina. There, she earned both her Master’s and Ph.D. at North Carolina State University. After graduating, Heather was offered a NRC Postdoc at NSSL in Norman, Oklahoma. After finishing her postdoc, she joined CIMMS and has contributed to a number of different projects both related to numerical weather prediction and radar meteorology.
What She Does:Heather has been with CIMMS/NSSL since 2009. Initially, she worked jointly for the Forecast and Radar Research Development Divisions, but transitioned to the Warning Research Development Division in 2015 to manage NSSL’s FAA research portfolio. Her specific interests include orographic precipitation and winter weather. She is currently working on projects to support detection and short-range prediction of weather hazards to the transportation sector. In June, Heather was honored with the American Meteorological Society's Service to the Society Award at the 17th Conference on Mountain Meteorology.
Trivia: Heather is married and has four cats. She and her husband enjoy watching low-budget disaster movies. Some of her favorites include "Lightning: Bolts of Destruction," "Tornado Valley," and "Christmas Twister."

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AMS Annual Meeting 2017

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The agenda for the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Meteorological Society has been released. The meeting will be held January 22-27, 2017 in Seattle, Washington. Check out all the great NSSL research to be presented:

 

 

Monday, 23 January 2017

Session 1
Lightning and Cloud Processes 1: Microphysics; electrification; numerical cloud models; thunderstorm kinematics, dynamics and lightning
Host: Eighth Conference on the Meteorological Application of Lightning Data

11:00 AM
1.1
From Extreme Flash Rates to Tropical Cyclones: Simulating Two Ends of the Spectrum
Edward R. Mansell, NSSL, Norman, OK; and A. Fierro

Session 1A
Flood prediction, analysis, decision support, & management I
Host: 31st Conference on Hydrology
Organizer: David Gochis, NCAR
Cochairs: Thomas Adams, NOAA/NWS; Jonathan J. Gourley, NOAA/NSSL

11:45 AM
1A.4
Machine Learning Predictions of Flash Floods
Race Clark III, CIMMS, Norman, OK; and Z. L. Flamig, J. J. Gourley, and Y. Hong

2:15 PM
2A.4
The Uncertainty of Precipitation-type Observations and its Effect on the Validation of Forecast Precipitation Type
Heather D. Reeves, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma and NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK

Poster Session 1
Advances in Modeling and Analysis Using Python Posters

Best Track: Object-Based Path Identification and Analysis
David Harrison, NSSL, Norman, OK; and A. McGovern, C. Karstens, and R. A. Lagerquist

Development of Real-Time Visualization and Verification Products for the NSSL Experimental Warn-on-Forecast System for Ensembles
Patrick S. Skinner, CIMMS/University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and K. H. Knopfmeier, D. M. Wheatley, and L. J. Wicker

Poster Session 1
EIPT Posters – Day 1

Signal Processing across the Atlantic: a Partnership between the UK Met Office and the US National Severe Storms Laboratory
Sebastian Torres, CIMMS, Norman, OK; and T. Darlington

The OCC NOAA Data Commons: First Year Experiences
Zachary L. Flamig, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL; and M. Patterson, W. Wells, and R. Grossman

Quality parameter for a weather radar antenna
Valery M. Melnikov, CIMMS, Norman, OK; and R. J. Doviak and D. Zrnic

Poster Session 1
Flood prediction, analysis, decision support, & management POSTERS

A Moisture Source Climatology for Flash Flood Events in the United States
Jessica M. Erlingis, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and J. J. Gourley and Y. Hong

Poster Session 1
Lightning and Meteorological Processes Posters

3-D Relationships of Lightning with the Kinematic and Microphysical Structure of the 29 May 2012 DC3 Storm
Elizabeth DiGangi, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and C. L. Ziegler, D. R. MacGorman, D. P. Betten, M. I. Biggerstaff, G. Zhang, and V. N. Mahale

Impact of Kinematics, Microphysics, and Electrification on the Formation of Bounded Weak Lightning Regions in a Simulated Supercell Storm
Conrad L. Ziegler, NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK; and E. R. Mansell, A. Fierro, K. Calhoun, and D. R. MacGorman

Poster Session 1
WAF/NWP Posters: Weather Phenomena, Observations, and Forecasting

On the sensitivity of bow-echo ensemble forecasts to grid spacing
John R. Lawson, CIMMS/NSSL, Norman, OK; and W. A. Gallus Jr.

A Reflectivity Climatology Study of the Contiguous United States Using the Multi-Year Reanalysis of Remotely Sensed Storms (MYRORSS)
Brandon R. Smith, OU/CIMMS and NOAA/OAR/NSSL, Norman, OK; and K. L. Ortega, A. E. Reinhart, M. C. Mahalik, and T. M. Smith

Session 3A
Flood prediction, analysis, decision support, & management III
Host: 31st Conference on Hydrology
Organizer: David Gochis, NCAR
Cochairs: Thomas Adams, NOAA/NWS; Jonathan J. Gourley, NSSL

5:00 PM
3A.5
FLASH use cases for the flash floods of 2016
Steven M. Martinaitis, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma and NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK; and J. J. Gourley and M. Kelsch

Themed Joint Session 4
The Present and Future of Lightning Observations and Their Applications – Invited Only
Hosts: (Joint between the Eighth Conference on the Meteorological Application of Lightning Data; and the Observation Symposium: Progress, Problems, and Prospects)

4:15 PM
TJ4.2
Lightning Detection and Mapping: Recent Research and Future Opportunities
Donald R. MacGorman, NOAA/OAR/NSSL, Norman, OK

4:30 PM
TJ4.3
Lightning Observations and Research: Integration with and Feedback from Operational Meteorology
Kristin Calhoun, OU/CIMMS, NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK

Tuesday, 24 January 2017

Session 1
Testbeds, Models and Data Assimilation to Accelerate the Transition of Research-to-Operations for Weather, Water, and Climate

9:30 AM
1.5
The Experimental Warning Program at the Hazardous Weather Testbed
Tiffany C. Meyer, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma and NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK; and K. M. Calhoun, G. S. Garfield, A. Gerard, J. J. Gourley, C. Karstens, D. M. Kingfield, D. LaDue, W. Line, C. Ling, S. M. Martinaitis, L. Rothfusz, T. M. Smith, and G. J. Stumpf

Session 4A
Forecasting Techniques: Winter and Severe Precipitation Systems

8:30 AM
4A.1
Verification and Analysis of Impact-Based Warnings: Assessing the Performance of Quantitative Hazard Forecasts in the Transition toward the FACETs Paradigm
C. A. M. Gerlach, NSSL, Norman, OK

Session 1
Special Symposium on Severe Local Storms: Observation needs to advance research, prediction and communication, Part I

9:00 AM
1.1
Observing Challenges in Past and Current Severe Storm Field Campaigns (Invited Presentation)
Erik Rasmussen, CIMMS, Norman, OK

Session 4
Machine Learning Part III

11:00 AM
4.3
Using Machine Learning to Predict Straight-line Convective Wind Hazards Throughout the Continental United States
Ryan A. Lagerquist, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and A. McGovern and T. Smith

Joint Session 4
Select Student Research for New Generation Environmental Remote Sensing and for Transitions of Research to Operations

11:15 AM
J4.4
Forecasting Left-Moving Supercells Using an Ensemble Data Assimilation System
Cameron J. Nixon, NSSL, Norman, OK; and T. A. Jones

11:45 AM
J4.6
Towards Consistency in Forecasting Severe Weather Events across a Wide Range of Temporal and Spatial Scales in the FACETs Paradigm
Makenzie Krocak, NSSL, Norman, OK; and H. E. Brooks

Session 4
University Education Initiatives-Part l

11:15 AM
4.3
Adding Difficulty in Weather Forecasting Challenges to Enhance Learning
William Gregory Blumberg, Univ. of Oklahoma/NSSL, Norman, OK

5
Where we go from here: Observational needs to support a thriving weather and climate enterprise
Hosts: (Joint between the Special Symposium on Individual, Social, and Cultural Observations in Weather and Climate Contexts; the 12th Symposium on Societal Applications: Policy, Research and Practice; and the Fifth Symposium on Building a Weather-Ready Nation: Enhancing Our Nation’s Readiness, Responsiveness, and Resilience to High Impact Weather Events )
Moderators: Kimberly E. Klockow, NOAA/OAR/OWAQ; Russ S. Schumacher, Colorado State Univ.
Panelists: Julie L. Demuth, NCAR; William Hooke, AMS Policy Program; Lans Rothfusz, NSSL; Ann Bostrom, University of Washington

Session 1
Core Weather-Ready Nation Activities

2:15 PM
1.4
Some Issues to Consider as Forecasts Evolve Over Time
Harold E. Brooks, NOAA, Norman, OK

Session 2
Considerations and Best Practices for the Transition of Research to Operations

2:15 PM
2.4
Designing Research to Co-Create a New Paradigm for a Continuous Flow of Information During Severe Weather
Daphne LaDue, CAPS/Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and C. D. Karstens, J. Correia Jr., C. Ling, R. Hoffman, and A. Gerard

Session 3
Special Symposium on Severe Local Storms: Observation needs to advance research, prediction and communication, Part III

2:00 PM
3.2
Verification of Convection-Permitting Models (Invited Presentation)
Adam Clark, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK

Session 4
Research with NOAA Forecasters and Partners: Current Activities and Future Directions

2:00 PM
4.3
Broadcast Meteorologist Decision Making in the 2016 Hazardous Weather Testbed Probabilistic Hazard Information Project
Holly Obermeier, OU/CIMMS and NOAA/OAR/NSSL, Norman, OK; and K. L. Nemunaitis-Berry, S. A. Jasko, D. LaDue, C. Karstens, G. M. Eosco, A. Gerard, and L. Rothfusz

Poster Session 1
7th Research to Operations (7R2O) – Poster Session

An Instantaneous Self-Assessment of Forecaster Cognitive Workload
Katie A. Wilson, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and P. L. Heinselman

Establishing a Baseline: What We Know about Tornado Warning Reception, Comprehension and Response
Makenzie Krocak, NSSL, Norman, OK; and J. T. Ripberger

Evaluating the Warning Decision Making Process in the 2016 Hydrometeorology Testbed — Hydrology (HMT-Hydro) Experiment
Steven M. Martinaitis, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma and NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK; and J. J. Gourley and T. C. Meyer

Poster Session 1
Houze Symposium Posters

On Tornadogenesis in Supercells as Detected by Rapid-scan, Mobile, Doppler Radars
Howard B. Bluestein, Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and Z. B. Wienhoff, D. W. Reif, K. J. Thiem, J. C. Snyder, J. B. Houser, and M. M. French

Poster Session 1
POSTER: Data Impact Experiments and OSSEs

Impacts of Storm Displacement Errors on Storm-Scale Analyses and Short-Term Forecasts
Derek R. Stratman, NRC/NSSL, Norman, OK; and C. K. Potvin and L. J. Wicker

Poster Session 1
Special Symposium on Severe Local Storms: Observation needs to advance research, prediction and communication, POSTERS

Assimilation of Ground-based Remote Sensing Observations into Storm-scale NWP for a Tornadic Event during PECAN Field Campaign
Nusrat Yussouf, CIMMS/NSSL, Norman, OK; and T. A. Jones and D. D. Turner

Impact of assimilating pre-convective upsonde observations on short-term forecasts of convection observed during MPEX
Michael C. Coniglio, NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK ; and S. M. Hitchcock and K. H. Knopfmeier

Tornadic mesocyclone wind retrievals from radar observations
Qin Xu, NSSL, Norman, OK; and L. Wei and K. Nai

A Multi-Radar, Multi-Sensor-based Hail Climatology for the CONUS: 2000-2011
Derek Rosseau, OU/CIMMS and NOAA/OAR/NSSL, Norman, OK; and K. L. Ortega, A. E. Reinhart, and H. Obermeier

Analysis of a Severe MCS and Nocturnal Tornadogenesis sampled by PECAN on 5 July 2015
Matthew D. Flournoy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and M. C. Coniglio, K. H. Knopfmeier, D. M. Wheatley, C. L. Ziegler, R. S. Schumacher, M. D. Parker, E. R. Mansell, M. I. Biggerstaff, and T. J. Schuur

Quantifying Reporting Biases in the SPC Tornado Database
Corey K. Potvin, CIMMS/NSSL, Norman, OK; and C. Broyles, P. S. Skinner, and H. E. Brooks

Progress of the ASCE Wind Speed Estimation Standards Committee
James G. LaDue, NOAA/NWS/Warning Decision Training Division, Norman, OK; and M. Levitan, J. Wurman, C. Karstens, F. T. Lombardo, B. W. MacAloney II, T. M. Brown-Giammanco, W. L. Coulbourne, J. A. Womble, and J. P. Camp

Observations of the Afternoon to Evening Transition Occurring Within the Southern Great Plains Severe Convective Environment
William Gregory Blumberg, Univ. of Oklahoma/NSSL, Norman, OK; and D. D. Turner

Initial Results from MYRORSS: A Multi-Radar/Multi-Sensor Climatology of the United States
Travis M. Smith, U. of Oklahoma / National Severe Storms Lab, Norman, OK; and K. L. Ortega, K. M. Calhoun, C. Karstens, D. M. Kingfield, R. A. Lagerquist, M. C. Mahalik, A. McGovern, T. C. Meyer, H. Obermeier, A. E. Reinhart, and B. R. Smith

Poster Session 1
Successes of Weather-Ready Nation

An Investigation of NWS Warning Outbreaks for Severe Convective Events
Zachary S. Bruick, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN; and C. Karstens

Temporal and Spatial Aspects of Emergency Manager Use of Prototype Probabilistic Hazard Information
Daphne LaDue, CAPS/Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and C. D. Karstens, J. Correia Jr., J. E. Hocker, S. J. Sanders, M. A. Dovil, C. A. Shivers, A. Bean, T. Adams, and A. Gerard

Poster Session 2
EIPT Posters – Day 2

Update the Blockage Data for WSR-88D Radars Used in the MRMS System
Lin Tang, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and J. Zhang, A. Arthur, and C. Langston

A Hybrid Single-/Dual-Polarization Hail Detection and Sizing Algorithm for the WSR-88D
Austin E. Romer, OU/CIMMS and NOAA/OAR/NSSL, Norman, OK; and H. Obermeier and K. L. Ortega

Poster Session 2
Lightning Technology and Societal Applications of Lightning Data Posters

Lightning Data Integration and Comparison with Multi-Radar-Based Severe Weather Products and Climatologies
Kristin M. Calhoun, OU/CIMMS, NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK; and D. M. Kingfield, T. C. Meyer, and K. L. Ortega

Poster Session 2
WAF/NWP Posters: Forecasting Tools, Numerical Weather Prediction, and Tropical Cyclones

Adaptation of an object-based verification method for moist convection
John R. Lawson, CIMMS/NSSL, Norman, OK; and W. A. Gallus Jr.

Applications of Radar-Derived Shear Products Using an Updated Linear Least-Squares Derivative Technique
Matthew C. Mahalik, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma NOAA/OAR/NSSL, Norman, OK; and B. R. Smith and H. Obermeier

Correspondence of Storm Attributes in NWP and Observations: a Look at Rotation Strength and Environmental Characteristics
Burkely T. Gallo, University of Oklahoma/NSSL, Norman, OK; and A. J. Clark, B. T. Smith, R. L. Thompson, I. L. Jirak, and S. R. Dembek

Assessing MCS Predictability with the NSSL Experimental Warn-on-Forecast System for ensembles
Kent H. Knopfmeier, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma, NOAA/OAR/NSSL, Norman, OK; and D. M. Wheatley, P. S. Skinner, D. C. Dowell, T. Ladwig, C. R. Alexander, and G. J. Creager

Session 5
New Initiatives at NOAA in Support of Societal Resilience and Risk Communication

4:45 PM
5.4
What If? A Look into Potential Future Products and Services at SPC
Patrick T. Marsh, NOAA/NWS/NCEP/SPC, Norman, OK; and R. S. Schneider, W. F. Bunting, S. J. Weiss, K. Pirtle, J. Correia Jr., and S. A. Erickson

Session 7A
Testbed, Proving Ground, and Research-to-Operations Activities
Host: 28th Conference on Weather Analysis and Forecasting / 24th Conference on Numerical Weather Prediction
Chair: Philip N. Schumacher, NWS
CoChair: Adam J. Clark, NSSL

4:00 PM
7A.1
Application and Evaluation of the Community Leveraged Unified Ensemble (CLUE) during the 2016 NOAA/HWT Spring Forecasting Experiment
Israel L. Jirak, NOAA/NWS/NCEP/Storm Prediction Center, Norman, OK; and C. J. Melick, J. Correia Jr., S. J. Weiss, J. S. Kain, L. J. Wicker, A. R. Dean, B. T. Gallo, C. D. Karstens, K. W. Thomas, M. Xue, F. Kong, A. Kennedy, J. Markel, G. S. Romine, K. H. Knopfmeier, C. Alexander, K. R. Fossell, and J. Carley

Themed Joint Session 9
Innovative water cycle observations

4:45 PM
TJ9.4
Innovative Remote Sensors for Streamflow Measurement
Daniel J. Wasielewski, CIMMS, Norman, OK; and J. J. Gourley and J. W. Fulton

Themed Joint Session 11
Data Assimilation, Research, Theory and Practice

4:00 PM
TJ11.1
A Weather-Adaptive Hybrid Gain WRF-DART and 3DVAR Analysis and Forecast System with Automatic Storm Positioning and On-demand Capability
Jidong Gao, NSSL/NOAA, Norman, OK; and Y. Wang, D. M. Wheatley, K. H. Knopfmeier, T. A. Jones, G. J. Creager, L. J. Wicker, and J. S. Kain

Joint Session 11
Societal and Structural Hazards of Lightning Part 2 (Safety for events, outdoor activities, and other population groups; Protection of the built environment; Preparedness and education)

4:15 PM
J11.2
Anthropogenic Structures and Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Location: 1992-2015
Darrel M. Kingfield, OU/CIMMS & NOAA/OAR/NSSL, Norman, OK; and K. Calhoun

Wednesday, 25 January 2017

Joint Session 1
Polar Clouds and Climate Part I

9:15 AM
J1.4
Influence of Orographic Lift on the Occurrence of Liquid Bearing Clouds over the Greenland Ice Sheet
Jonathan Edwards-Opperman, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and D. D. Turner and S. M. Cavallo

Session 8A
New Ensemble Techniques, Part I

9:00 AM
8A.3
Warn-on-Detection to Warn-on-Forecast by 2020?
Pamela L. Heinselman, NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK; and L. J. Wicker and J. S. Kain

Session 8B
Precipitation processes and observations for atmospheric, land surface, and hydrological modeling I

9:30 AM
8B.5
Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Estimates with Ground and Space-based Radars
Pierre-Emmanuel Kirstetter, NOAA/NSSL / Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and J. J. Gourley and J. Zhang

Session 8B
Ronald W. Przybylinski Memorial Session on Elevated Convection

9:15 AM
8B.4
Simulated nocturnal convective systems from the PECAN field experiment
Matthew D. Parker, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC; and R. S. Schumacher, C. L. Ziegler, M. I. Biggerstaff, M. C. Coniglio, E. R. Mansell, and T. J. Schuur

Joint Session 9
Research to Operations: Transitioning from Science to Service, Part I

8:45 AM
J9.2
FACETs and the Probability of What Project: Research to Operations Progress and Challenges in Understanding and Conveying Uncertainty
Alan Gerard, NSSL, Norman, OK; and L. Rothfusz

9:30 AM
J9.5
Pro-FLASH: A Probabilistic Framework for Flash Flood Warning in the United States
Humberto Vergara, CIMMS, Norman, OK; and J. J. Gourley and P. E. Kirstetter

Session 9A
New Ensemble Techniques, Part II
Host: 28th Conference on Weather Analysis and Forecasting / 24th Conference on Numerical Weather Prediction
Chair: Josh Hacker, NCAR
CoChair: Burkely Gallo, Univ. of Oklahoma/NSSL

Themed Joint Session 13
Subsurface, Surface, and Lower Tropospheric Measurements

10:45 AM
TJ13.2
Ground-based Remotely Sensed Water Vapor and Temperature Profiles in the Lower Troposphere: Progress and Prospects (Invited Presentation)
David D. Turner, NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK; and T. M. Weckwerth and S. M. Spuler

Session 1
High Performance Computing for Weather, Water, and Climate: Great Opportunities, Grand Challenges

2:15 PM
1.4
Poster Session Introduction
Gerald J. Creager, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma/NSSL, Norman, OK; and T. Oizumi, J. Gundy, J. Beck, and Y. Wang

Session 10B
Mesoscale Meteorology and Severe Local Storms, Part II

1:30 PM
10B.1
A Systematic Methodology for Assessing the Ability of Atmospheric Bores and Solitons to Initiate Elevated Deep Convection
Steven E Koch, NOAA/National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, OK

Poster Session 1
Multi-scale Atmospheric Predictability Poster Session

Sensitivity of Supercell Simulations to Initial Condition Resolution
Corey K. Potvin, CIMMS/NSSL, Norman, OK; and E. M. Murillo, M. L. Flora, and D. M. Wheatley

Poster Session 3
WAF/NWP Posters: Numerical Weather Prediction

Ensemble Forecasts and Verification of the May 2015 Multi-Hazard Severe Weather Event in Oklahoma
Austin A Coleman, NWC REU Program, Norman, OK; and N. Yussouf

Using a Frequently Updated, Storm-Scale Ensemble Prediction System for Short-Term Prediction of Heavy Rainfall
Nusrat Yussouf, CIMMS/NSSL, Norman, OK; and J. S. Kain and A. J. Clark

Poster Session 9
Precipitation processes and observations for atmospheric, land surface, and hydrological modeling – Poster Session

Applying an Evaporation Correction Scheme for Real-Time Radar-Based Instantaneous Rain Rates
Steven M. Martinaitis, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma and NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK; and H. M. Grams, J. Zhang, K. W. Howard, and Y. Qi

The Need for Robust and Accurate Precipitation Gauge Metadata for Radar-Based QPE
Steven M. Martinaitis, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma and NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK; and H. M. Grams, B. T. Kaney, S. S. Harkema, and K. W. Howard

The delineation of the rain/snow line on the side of a mountain and its effects on runoff
Heather D. Reeves, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma and NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK; and W. M. Bartolini

Session 9B
Societal Responses, Risk, and Resilience to Extreme Weather Events

4:30 PM
9B.3
Are Central Oklahomans Fixing their Tornado Sheltering Problem?
Christopher Karstens, OU/CIMMS NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK

Session 10
Precipitation processes and observations for atmospheric, land surface, and hydrological modeling III

4:30 PM
10.3
Impact of Rain Gauge Location Errors on Verification of Radar-Based Precipitation Estimates
Sebastian S. Harkema, NWC REU Program, Norman, OK; and H. M. Grams, S. M. Martinaitis, and B. T. Kaney

Thursday, 26 January 2017

Session 2
Advances in Software Environments and Tools for Exploiting HPC

8:30 AM
2.1
A Python-Driven Workflow to Automate and Process Many Numerical Simulations
John R. Lawson, CIMMS/NSSL, Norman, OK

Session 6
RADAR – MPAR Research and Development
Host: 33rd Conference on Environmental Information Processing Technologies
Chair: Michael J. Istok, NOAA/NWS
Cochairs: Mark Yeary, ARRC – Advanced Radar Research Center; Kurt D. Hondl, NOAA/NSSL

8:45 AM
6.2
Multifunction Phased Array Radar Research and Development Efforts
Kurt D. Hondl, NOAA, Norman, OK

9:00 AM
6.3
Plans for Weather Observation and Calibration with the Advanced Technology Demonstrator
Dusan S. Zrnic, NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK; and I. R. Ivic, C. Fulton, D. Mirkovic, G. Zhang, and Y. Zhang

9:15 AM
6.4
The Effects of Antenna Tilt in PPAR
Igor R. Ivic, Univ. of Oklahoma / CIMMS, Norman, OK

Session 7
Advances in Decision-Making Practices

8:30 AM
7.1
An Examination of the Impact of Probabilistic vs. Deterministic Information on the Decision-Making Practices of Emergency Managers: 2016 HWT Case Study
Cassandra A Shivers, Howard University, Washington, DC; and S. J. Sanders, T. Adams, D. LaDue, A. Gerard, and L. P. Rothfusz

8:45 AM
7.2
Verification and Analysis of Probabilistic Hazards Information Guidance
David Harrison, NSSL, Norman, OK; and C. Karstens and A. McGovern
Igor R. Ivic, Univ. of Oklahoma / CIMMS, Norman, OK
John R. Lawson, CIMMS/NSSL, Norman, OK

Session 7A
RADAR – Signal Processing for Next Generation Radars
Host: 33rd Conference on Environmental Information Processing Technologies
Chair: Michael J. Istok, NOAA/NWS
Cochairs: Mark Yeary, ARRC – Advanced Radar Research Center; Kurt D. Hondl, NOAA

10:30 AM
7A.1
Demonstration of Weather Observations With a Cylindrical Polarimetric Phased Array Radar
Andrew D. Byrd, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and C. Fulton, R. D. Palmer, S. Islam, D. Zrnic, R. J. Doviak, Y. Zhang, and G. Zhang

11:00 AM
7A.3
Weather Radar Time-Series Simulators: Improving Accuracy and Performance
Christopher Curtis, CIMMS/University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK

11:15 AM
7A.4
The Bootstrap Dual Polarimetric Spectral Density Estimator
Arturo Umeyama, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and S. Torres and B. L. Cheong

11:30 AM
7A.5
Adapting CLEAN-AP for C-Band Polarimetric Doppler Weather Radars
David A. Warde, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma and NOAA/OAR/NSSL, Norman, OK; and S. M. Torres

11:45 AM
7A.6
Characterizing Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation Strategies and Impacts
John Lake, Univ. of Oklahoma, ARRC, Norman, OK; and C. D. Curtis and M. Yeary

Session 3A
New observations from field programs

1:45 PM
3A.2
The Land-Atmosphere Feedback Experiment: Theory and Design
David D. Turner, NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK; and V. Wulfmeyer

Session 3B
Special Session: Unmanned aerial vehicles for atmospheric research and field programs

2:00 PM
3B.3
Severe Local Storm Environmental Observations from UAS
Steven E Koch, NOAA/National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, OK; and B. Argrow, P. B. Chilson, M. Fengler, E. N. Rasmussen, D. D. Turner, R. Huck, A. L’Afflitto, and J. Salazar

Joint Session 7
Advances in Data Assimilation and Observational Sensitivity with High Performance Computing

2:15 PM
J7.4
Short-term (0-6 h) Probabilistic Extreme Rainfall Forecasts Using a Prototype Warn-on-Forecast System
Nusrat Yussouf, CIMMS/NSSL, Norman, OK; and J. S. Kain, K. H. Knopfmeier, J. Zhang, and Y. Wang

Session 8
Capabilities Enabling the Transition of Research to Operations: Part III

1:30 PM
8.1
Prototyping a Next-Generation Severe Weather Warning System for FACETs
Christopher Karstens, OU/CIMMS NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK; and D. LaDue, J. Correia Jr., K. M. Calhoun, T. Smith, C. Ling, T. C. Meyer, A. McGovern, R. A. Lagerquist, D. M. Kingfield, B. T. Smith, E. M. Leitman, J. L. Cintineo, J. P. Wolfe, A. Gerard, and L. P. Rothfusz

1:45 PM
8.2
Preparing for FACETs: Future Warning Decision-Making Training Impacts from the 2016 Hazard Services–Probabilistic Hazard Information Experiment at the NOAA Hazardous Weather Testbed
Alyssa V. Bates, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma and NOAA/NWS/WDTD, Norman, OK; and J. G. LaDue, G. J. Stumpf, T. L. Hansen, C. Ling, K. L. Manross, D. M. Kingfield, T. C. Meyer, and C. Golden

Session 8A
RADAR – Radar Meteorology Science & Applications

1:45 PM
8A.2
Hybrid-Scan Estimator: Using split cut data to improve the quality of polarimetric variables
David Schvartzman, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma and NOAA/OAR/NSSL, Norman, OK; and D. A. Warde and S. M. Torres

2:00 PM
8A.3
High Temporal-Resolution Monitoring of Ice Crystal Alignment
Mark E. Weber, NOAA/OAR/NSSL/CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and D. S. Zrnic and P. Zhang

2:30 PM
8A.5
Severe Weather Research at NSSL Using the MYRORSS Database
Kiel L. Ortega, OU/CIMMS and NOAA/OAR/NSSL, Norman, OK; and T. M. Smith

Session 9A
RADAR – WSR-88D Program and Operational Radar Experiences
Host: 33rd Conference on Environmental Information Processing Technologies
Chair: Michael J. Istok, NOAA/NWS
Cochairs: Mark Yeary, ARRC – Advanced Radar Research Center; Kurt D. Hondl, NOAA

4:15 PM
9A.4
Detecting and Tracking Airborne Volcanic Ash with WSR-88D Radars
Donald W. Burgess, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and V. M. Melnikov and R. L. Murnan

Session 14
Lightning and Radar-Based Observing Capabilities in Support of Aviation Operations

4:00 PM
14.3
Latency within mosaicked radar products and its effect on aviation operations
Heather D. Reeves, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma and NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK; and L. Tang, J. Zhang, J. brogden, and K. W. Howard

4:15 PM
14.4
A Terrestrial Multi-Radar Echo Top Climatology of the Continental United States Derived from MYRORSS: 2000 – 2012
Darrel M. Kingfield, OU/CIMMS & NOAA/OAR/NSSL, Norman, OK; and K. L. Ortega and T. C. Meyer

4:30 PM
14.5
Utilizing a Polarimetric Size Sorting Signature to Develop a Convective Nowcasting Algorithm
Joseph Picca, SPC, Norman, OK; and D. M. Kingfield and A. V. Ryzhkov

4:45 PM
14.6
Multi-Radar/Multi-Sensor tools for aviation
Heather D. Reeves, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma and NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK; and K. W. Howard

Session 15B
Predictability and Data Assimilation

4:15 PM
15B.4
Real-time storm-scale data assimilation and forecasting experiments for NOAA’s Warn-on-Forecast Project
Dustan M. Wheatley, CIMMS/Univ. of Oklahoma, NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK; and K. H. Knopfmeier, P. S. Skinner, D. C. Dowell, T. E. Thompson, C. Alexander, and G. J. Creager

4:30 PM
15B.5
Assessment of assimilating Cloud Water Path into the NSSL Experimental Warn-on-Forecast System for Ensemble (NEWS-e) during the 2016 Hazardous Weather Testbed
Thomas A. Jones, CIMMS, Norman, OK; and D. M. Wheatley, K. H. Knopfmeier, P. S. Skinner, D. C. Dowell, T. T. Ladwig, C. R. Alexander, P. Minnis, and R. Palikonda

The entire AMS 2017 Agenda can be found here: https://ams.confex.com/ams/97Annual/webprogram/meeting.html

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NSSL’s Dr. Rodger Brown to Retire

rodger-brownRodger A. Brown is retiring after 51 years as a research meteorologist, including 46 years of federal service with NOAA’s National Severe Storms Laboratory in Norman, Oklahoma.

Brown started at NSSL on the same day NOAA was formed, October 3, 1970, just as Doppler weather radar was becoming operational. He and his colleagues were interested in using this new resource to learn more about how severe storms develop. On May 24, 1973, Brown was working in the newly built, experimental Norman Doppler Radar when a tornado devastated the small town of Union City, Oklahoma. Working with former NSSL researcher Les Lemon, who monitored the surveillance radar, Brown and his team determined where to scan the storm to collect the data they would need.

The following morning, Brown surveyed the damage in Union City with fellow researchers, including Don Burgess, retired NSSL research meteorologist who is now with the University of Oklahoma’s Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies.  Brown recalls coming to grips with the magnitude and severity of the storm. “I think that’s the first time we realized the extent and how devastating the tornado was,” Brown said.

In the following weeks, Brown, Burgess, and Lemon pored over the data. This was the first time they had visualized the entire lifecycle of a tornado. They discovered the existence of a Tornadic Vortex Signature, a measurement of circulation aloft provided by the Doppler radar that indicated a tornado may be forming. This important warning device is still used today by NOAA’s National Weather Service to issue more timely severe thunderstorm and tornado warnings.

Brown earned his bachelor’s degree in earth sciences from Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, in 1960. He received his master of science degree. in geophysical sciences from the University of Chicago in 1962, and his Ph.D. in meteorology from the University of Oklahoma in 1989. During his career, he has been an active member of the American Meteorological Society, the National Weather Association, the American Geophysical Union, Sigma Xi, and England’s Royal Meteorological Society. He has held elected offices in the NWA and served as committee chairs and conference chairs for both the AMS and NWA.  Outside of work, he enjoys reading, making Native American style flutes, and serving as a Boy Scout leader. He is looking forward to spending more time with his family in retirement, including his wife, three children, and five grandchildren, as well as volunteering with various weather-related organizations in Norman.

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