Student Mentoring

I sincerely enjoy working with students! Occasionally I have paid research positions, but I also mentor students through programs like the NWC REU or via voluntary research. If you’re interested in the type of research I do and would like to explore student research options, please get in touch.

In my work with students, I aim to be clear about what my expectations are for our time working together. A summary of my expectations can be found here (adapted from Dr. Mary K. Salcedo).

Current Students

Graduate Research 2020-2024:
Boundary layer flow associated with wind energy resources

Arianna Jordan
University of Oklahoma
School of Meteorology
Expected Graduation: Late 2024
Degree: Doctor of Philosophy, Meteorology

Arianna earned a Bachelor of Science degree in meteorology from San Jose State University and a Master of Science degree in atmospheric science from Howard University before joining the PhD program at OU. I serve as a co-adviser for Arianna alongside Dr. Petra Klein (OU/SoM/AGS) and scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Arianna’s work will explore boundary layer features and flow in the context of wind energy resources. Learn more about Arianna on her webpage.


Graduate Research 2020-2022:
Boundary layer characteristics during CHEESEHEAD: typical characteristics and analysis of a 2-day severe convection event

Nolan Meister
University of Oklahoma
School of Meteorology
Expected Graduation: Spring 2022
Degree: Master of Science, Meteorology

Nolan also worked with me as an undergraduate student (2019-2020).

Nolan Meister, a SoM Master of Science student, is working with me, Petra Klein (OU), and a broad team of NOAA-OAR scientists to analyze observations collected during the 2019 CHEESEHEAD experiment. Nolan’s work focuses on characterizing the general boundary layer environment in the complex forested region and analysis of a 2-day severe convection event on July 19-20 2019. The case study connects observation and simulation components, including an evaluation of the NSSL Warn on Forecast System.


Undergraduate Research 2021-2022:
CLAMPS dataset analysis team

Victor Alvarez
University of Oklahoma
School of Meteorology
Expected Graduation: May 2024
Major: Meteorology







Marshall Baldwin
University of Oklahoma


Undergraduate Research 2021-2022:
Assessing multiyear boundary-layer variability in the southeastern United States

Isaac Medina
University of Oklahoma
School of Meteorology and
School of Aviation
Expected Graduation: 2024
Major: Meteorology
Major: Aviation Management – Air Traffic Management Concentration
Minor: General Business

Isaac also worked with me as an NWC REU student (2021).


Previous Students

Undergraduate Research 2020-2021:
Evaluating Polarimetric Retrievals of Boundary Layer Height Using State-of-the-Art Boundary Layer Profiling

Katie Giannakopoulos
University of Oklahoma
School of Meteorology
Expected Graduation: May 2022
Major: Meteorology
Minor: Mathematics

Katie Giannakopolous worked as an undergraduate research assistant with me and Dr. Jacob Carlin (CIMMS) on a project funded by a CIMMS DDRF internal grant. This project used the CLAMPS platforms to detect boundary layer height and evaluate boundary layer height as detected from polarimetric WSR-88D radar clear air observations, extending the work of Banghoff et al. (2018) beyond synoptic observation times.


Undergraduate Research Assistant 2019-2021:
Defining the capabilities of boundary layer profiling systems for operations in the southeastern United States

Tyler Pardun
University of Oklahoma
School of Meteorology
BS Earned: May 2021
Major: Meteorology
Minor(s): Mathematics

I mentored Tyler Pardun as a CIMMS undergraduate research assistant on my VORTEX-SE grant. Tyler focuses on data exploration and verification of short-term forecast and warning operational tools using ground-based boundary layer profiler data. After his graduation, we continue to collaborate on these datasets.
Outcomes:
Find Tylers 2021 AMS Presentation here.


NWC Research Experience for Undergraduates 2021:
Pre-Convective HSLC Environment Analysis of a Supercell Using Boundary Layer Profiling Data

Dana Katelin Pawlowski
East Carolina University
Department of Geography, Planning, & the Environment
Expected Graduation: Fall 2022
Major: Applied Atmospheric Science

I acted as lead mentor on a mentor team for Dana’s REU project which built upon the research Tyler Pardun completed based on Southeast US CLAMPS observations. Dana was able to focus on a single convection mode (cellular) and a single case more in depth, and validated many of Tyler’s findings.
Outcomes:
Read Dana’s final REU paper.


NWC Research Experience for Undergraduates 2021:
Boundary Layer Depth Measurement Disparities During the Evening Transitional Period

Isaac Medina
University of Oklahoma
School of Meteorology and
School of Aviation
Expected Graduation: 2024
Major: Meteorology
Major: Aviation Management – Air Traffic Management Concentration
Minor: General Business

I served as co-mentor to Isaac alongside two CIMMS colleagues on a project comparing dual-pol radar, fuzzy-logic based CLAMPS, and UAS boundary-layer height estimates. We worked together to understand why the different methods would deviate in transition periods and what those deviations meant.
Outcomes:
Read Isaac’s final REU paper.


Graduate Research 2019-2020:
Evaluating Warn-on-Forecast System (WoFS) predictions of supercell inflow environments

Jordan Laser
University of Oklahoma
School of Meteorology
Degree Earned: August 2020
Master of Science, Meteorology

I served as member of SoM Master of Science student Jordan Laser’s advisory team. Jordan evaluated NSSL’s WoFS ability to represent the inflow environment of supercell thunderstorms. To accomplish this, he used Doppler lidar and radiosonde observations collected during the TORUS campaign. Jordan was also advised by Dr. Patrick Skinner – CIMMS and Dr. Mike Coniglio – NSSL.
Outcomes:
Find Jordan’s AMS2020 presentation abstract here.
Find Jordan’s final thesis here.


Senior Capstone 2019-2020:
Investigation of supercell characteristics and their sensitivity to hodograph shape using idealized WRF simulations

Maci Gibson
University of Oklahoma
School of Meteorology
BS Earned: May 2020
Major: Meteorology
Minor(s): Mathematics

Marisa Nuzzo
University of Oklahoma
School of Meteorology
BS Earned: May 2020
Major: Meteorology
Minor(s): Mathematics & Broadcast Journalism

I mentored Maci and Marisa on a project exploring how low-level wind characteristics are related to supercell thunderstorm dynamics and morphology. OU SoM PhD student Matthew Flournoy served as co-mentor for this project.
Outcomes:
Check out Maci and Marisa’s final capstone paper here.


Senior Capstone 2019-2020:
Utilizing Mobile Doppler Wind Lidar Observations and Idealized Modeling to Understand the Characteristics of a Density Current’s Vertical Velocity Field

James Cuellar
University of Oklahoma
School of Meteorology
BS Earned: May 2020
Major: Meteorology
Minor(s): Mathematics & GIS

Nolan Meister
University of Oklahoma
School of Meteorology
BS Earned: May 2020
Major: Meteorology
Minor(s): Communication

I mentored James and Nolan on a project using TORUS 2019 mobile lidar observations to characterize updrafts observed along thunderstorm outflow boundaries. OU SoM PhD student Dylan Reif served as co-mentor for this project.
Outcomes:
Check out James & Nolan’s AMS Student Conference 2020 abstract here.
Check out James & Nolan’s final capstone paper here.


NWC Research Experience for Undergraduates 2019:
Exploring Great Plains Nocturnal Low Level Jet Heterogeneity and Connections to Convection Initiation

Michelle Spencer
At time of REU:
Metropolitan State University of Denver
Dept. of Earth & Atmospheric Science
BS earned: December 2019
Major: Meteorology

I mentored Michelle on a project that investigates connections between Great Plains nocturnal low level jets and overnight convection initiation using PECAN observations and WRF simulations. OU SoM Professor and College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences Associate Dean Dr. Petra Klein acted as co-mentor during the REU program. After the summer REU ended, Michelle and I continued work on this topic exploring deeper connections between these common Great Plains phenomena while she worked toward her MS at University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee.
Outcomes:
Read Michelle’s final REU paper.
Check out Michelle’s AMS Annual 2020 presentation.