Elizabeth Smith, Ph. D.
Meteorologist

Elizabeth is a research meteorologist at the NOAA-National Severe Storms Laboratory in Norman, Oklahoma.

Active Areas of Research

TORUS: Targeted Observations by Radar and UAS of Supercells

My role in the TORUS project includes developing and deploying a mobile Doppler lidar system, analyzing wind observations, and investigating pre-convection boundary layers.

VORTEX-SE:  Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes EXperiment-Southeast

Starting Sept. 2019, I am leading a 2-year project as part of the VORTEX-SE program called Defining the capabilities of boundary layer profiling systems for operations in the southeastern United States.

Nocturnal Low-Level Jets and the Plains Elevated Convection At Night Experiment (PECAN)

My Ph.D. dissertation work focused on documenting the Great Plains nocturnal low-level jet using PECAN observations. I am expanding that work to evaluate more cases and explore connections to nighttime convection initiation.

Boundary Layer Observation Methods

Across all my active projects, I use modern methods of observing the boundary layer. I work closely with the OU and NOAA/NSSL CLAMPS platforms, and I evaluate new platforms that could enhance NSSL’s and NOAA’s upper-air observing network.

About Elizabeth…

I joined NOAA/NSSL as a research meteorologist in January 2020. My work at NSSL focuses on boundary layer processes relevant to near- and pre-storm environments and convection initiation. I specialize in boundary layer profiler observations. Before starting federal service, I spent a year as a postdoc at CIMMS working on development and deployment of boundary layer profiling systems, as well as the exploration of experimental systems. In December 2018 I earned my Ph.D. in Meteorology from the University of Oklahoma. Before graduate study at OU, I earned a B.S. in Meteorology at the California University of Pennsylvania in 2014. You can learn more about me and my work by taking a look at my CV, heading to my About Me page, or getting in touch.

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