NWA Annual Meeting 2016

nwa-banner

Monday, September 12

Concurrent Session 3A – Radar
Location: TBD Session Co-Chairs:
Greg Stumpf, University of Oklahoma/CIMMS and NOAA/NWS/MDL, Norman, OK
Katie Bowden, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK

1:30
Rapid-Update Radar Data and its Potential Uses Within the Emergency Management Community
Charles M. Kuster, University of Oklahoma/CIMMS, Norman, OK
Pamela L. Heinselman, NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK
Jeffrey C. Snyder, University of Oklahoma /CIMMS, Norman, OK
Katie A. Bowden, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK
Douglas A. Speheger, NOAA/NWS, Norman, OK

1:45
Future Updates for the MRMS QPE Product Suite
Steven M. Martinaitis, University of Oklahoma/CIMMS, Norman, OK
Jian Zhang, Kenneth Howard and Steven Cocks, NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK
Karen Cooper, University of Oklahoma/CIMMS, Norman, OK

2:00
2015 Phased Array Radio Innovative Sensing Experiment
Pamela L. Heinselman, NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK
Katie A. Bowden, Darrell Kingfield, and Charles M. Kuster, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK

2:15
The 2016 Hazard Services- Probabilistic Hazard Information (HS-PHI) Experiment at the NOAA Hazardous Weather Testbed
Gregory J. Stumpf, University of Oklahoma/CIMMS and NOAA/NWS/MDL, Norman, OK
Tracy L. Hansen, NOAA/ESRL/GSD, Boulder, CO
James G. LaDue, NOAA/NWS/WDTD, Norman, OK
Chen Ling, University of Akron, Akron, OH
Kevin L. Manross, Colorado State University/CIRA and NOAA/ESRL/GSD, Boulder, CO

2:30
Overview of Improvements Made to the NSSL Azimuthal Shear Product
Matthew C. Mahalik, University of Oklahoma/CIMMS, Norman, OK
Brandon Smith, Darrel M. Kingfield, Kiel L. Ortega and Travis M. Smith,
University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK

Tuesday, September 13

Concurrent Session 6B – Communications
Location: TBD Session Co-Chairs:
Laura Myers, University of Alabama
Alan Gerard, NWA Treasurer, NWA Past President, Deputy Chief, Warning Research & Development Division, NSSL, Norman, OK

4:45
Identifying Key Characteristics of Severe Weather Communication Strategies for Optimal Emergency Managers’ and Broadcast Meteorologists’ Decision Making
Daphne S. LaDue, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK
Gina M. Eosco, Eastern Research Group, Arlington, VA
Susan A. Jasko, California University of Pennsylvania, California, PA
Terri Adams-Fuller and Shadya Sanders, Howard University, Washington, D.C.
Kim Klockow, NOAA/OAR, Silver Spring, MD
James Hocker, Oklahoma Climatological Survey, Norman, OK
Chris Karstens, University of Oklahoma/CIMMS, Norman, OK
Lans Rothfusz and Alan Gerard, NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK

Wednesday, September 14

Session 7 – Perspectives from Early Career/Young Scientists
Location: Hampton I-V Session Co-Chairs:
Elise Schultz, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL
Randy Graham, NOAA/NWA Salt Lake City, UT

8:30
Forecast Precipitation Type Using Random Forests
Kimberly L. Elmore, University of Oklahoma/NSSL. Norman, OK
Heather M. Grams, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK

9:30
Forecaster Interrogation of Phased Array Radar Data: An Eye-Tracking Experiment
Katie Bowden, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK
Pamela L. Heinselman, NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK
Ziho Kang, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK

Concurrent Session 8A- New Technology
Location: TBD Session Co-Chairs:
Brad Panovich, Adjunct Professor, UNC Charlotte, Chief Meteorologist, WCNC, Charlotte, NC
Chuck Graves, St. Louis University, St. Louis, MO

10:30
Understanding EM Information Needs During Severe Weather Events
Sean R. Ernst, University of Oklahoma, Pepperell, MA
Daphne, LaDue, University of Oklahoma/CAPS, Norman, OK
Alan Gerard, NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK

10:45
Recent Progress and Developments in the Forecasting a Continuum of Environmental
Threats (FACETs) Initiative
Alan Gerard, NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK

11:45
Prototyping a Next-Generation Severe Weather Warning System for FACETs
Chris D. Karstens, University of Oklahoma/CIMMS and NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK
Daphne LaDue University of Oklahoma/CAPS, Norman, OK
James Correia, Jr., University of Oklahoma/CIMMS and NOAA/NWS/SPC, Norman, OK
Kristin Calhoun and Travis Smith, University of Oklahoma/CIMMS and NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK

Thursday, September 15

Session 11 – Lightning
Location: Hampton I-V Session Co-Chairs:
Pat Market, NWA Past President, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
Paul Suffern, National Transportation Safety Board, Washington, DC

2:00
Probability of Cloud-to-Ground Lightning in the PHI tool
Tiffany Meyer and Kristin Calhoun, University of Oklahoma/CIMMS and NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK
David John Gagne, University of Oklahoma/CAPS, Norman, OK
Christopher Karstens, and Darrel Kingfield , University of Oklahoma/CIMMS and NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK


Posters

Session PA (Applied Research and New Techniques)
Monday 3-5PM

A.25 New Verification Techniques for FACETs: Geospatial warning verification system performance on the 2007-15 storm-based tornado warning database
Gregory J. Stumpf, University of Oklahoma/CIMMS and NOAA/NWS/MDL, Norman, OK
Brandon R. Smith, University of Oklahoma/CIMMS and NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK

A.37 Results from GOES-R and JPSS Proving Ground Demonstrations at the 2016 HWT Spring Experiment
Bill Line, University of Oklahoma/CIMMS and NOAA/NWS/SPC, Norman, OK

A.40 The MRMS Aviation Product Suite Expansion Plans
Heather D. Reeves, University of Oklahoma/CIMMS and NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK
Brian Entwistle, NOAA/NWS/AWC Kansas City, MO
Kenneth Howard, NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK

A.47 Application of a Range-Based Correction to Improve Azimuthal Shear Values at Distance from a WSR-88D Radar
Brandon R. Smith, University of Oklahoma/CIMMS, Norman, OK
Matthew C. Mahalik and Darrel Kingfield University of Oklahoma/CIMMS and NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK
Kiel Ortega, and Travis Smith, University of Oklahoma/CIMMS, Norman, OK

A.55 Improving Surface Rain Rates by Accounting for Evaporation in MRMS Radar-Based QPE
Steven M. Martinaitis, Heather Grams and Youcun Qi, University of Oklahoma/CIMMS and NOAA/NSSL
Kenneth Howard, NOAA/NSSL, Norman, OK

Session PB (Case Studies)
Tuesday 10AM – Noon

B.69 Color Blindness in the Weather Enterprise: Discussion, and a Look at Solutions
Matt Bolton, Saint Leo University, Saint Leo, FL
Grant Wise, Union University, Jackson, TN
William Blumberg, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK

Share this:

Gab at the Lab: Holly Obermeier

Holly Obermeier, Research Associate (CIMMS/NSSL)

Holly-Obermeier

Background:M.S., Meteorology, University of Nebraska - Lincoln (2014)
B.S., Meteorology and Climatology, University of Nebraska - Lincoln (2007)
Experience:Holly was born and raised in Omaha, Nebraska, and earned both her bachelor’s and Master’s degrees at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln. Upon completion of her bachelor’s program, she began her career as a broadcast meteorologist. She first worked at KLBK, the CBS station in Lubbock, Texas, from 2008-2010. Then, she moved on to ABC-affiliated KETV in Omaha, Nebraska, where she remained until 2015. As a broadcaster, Holly enjoyed forecasting and severe weather coverage, and she specialized in radar analysis. She came to Oklahoma in 2015 as a participant in the Hazardous Weather Testbed, where she was intrigued by the opportunities in research meteorology. In September 2015, she was hired as a full-time research associate with OU CIMMS.
What She Does:Holly endeavors to improve severe weather warnings by working with radar data. Her current work focuses on identification of thunderstorm types using WSR-88D radar data. She is helping to build an algorithm through a process called machine learning, aiming to assist weather forecasters who are making warning decisions. Holly also studies impact-based tornado warnings, and was involved in this year’s PHI project in the Hazardous Weather Testbed, studying how broadcast meteorologists may use and communicate warning information in the future. She applied her on-air experience at NSSL, hosting the most recent “Bite-Sized Science” video on Eye-Tracking Technology.
Trivia: Holly enjoys hiking, camping, running, frisbee, photography, and hanging out with her husband, Jeremy.

Share this:

Severe Weather 101

svrwx101

Do you have questions about severe weather? Are you a teacher, student, or weather enthusiast who wants to learn more about atmospheric phenomena? If so, then we have just what you need!

Check out our Severe Weather 101 pages, where you can learn about thunderstorms, tornadoes, winter weather, and beyond. Visit each individual page for all the basics about the phenomenon of your choice, Frequently Asked Questions, and lots more.

In early 2015, NOAA’s National Severe Storms Laboratory completely overhauled Severe Weather 101 in preparation for the active spring storm season. Each page was converted to a new, more responsive format. With this design, it became easier than ever to access the information you are searching for, and you took notice! Traffic to our Education pages increased by 51% in 2015, accounting for 92% of the total increase in traffic to the NSSL website!

What else would you like to see in Severe Weather 101? How can NSSL help you to be more engaged with the weather? If you have suggestions for how we can improve our website, please contact us at nssl.outreach@noaa.gov. We look forward to hearing from you. And, this spring, remember to stay weather aware!

Share this:

NOAA Scientists tackle mystery of nighttime thunderstorms

PECAN researchers will deploy an armada of instruments after dark, including weather balloons. (Credit: NOAA).
PECAN researchers will deploy an armada of instruments after dark, including weather balloons. (Credit: NOAA).

This summer, more than 20 NOAA scientists will stay up late to learn why some thunderstorms form and grow at night, without the energy from the sun’s heat. They will be participating in the Plains Elevated Convection At Night (PECAN), a large, intensive field campaign to collect data before and during nighttime thunderstorms in the western Great Plains from June 1 to July 15.

PECAN researchers will deploy instrumented aircraft, ground-based instruments, mobile radars, and weather balloons to learn what triggers these storms, how the atmosphere supports their lifecycle, and how they impact lives, property, agriculture and the water budget in the region. Meteorologists believe these targeted observations will build understanding and ultimately improve forecasts of these sometimes damaging storms.

A nighttime thunderstorm near Scottsbluff, NE. Photo credit: Chris Spannagle.
A nighttime thunderstorm near Scottsbluff, NE. Photo credit: Chris Spannagle.

“Large nighttime thunderstorms are an essential source of summer rain for crops, but also produce widespread and potentially hazardous severe weather, excessive rainfall, flash flooding, and unusually frequent cloud-to-ground lightning,” said Conrad Ziegler, a research meteorologist at the NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory and principal scientist for PECAN.  “Weather forecast models often struggle to accurately account for these. The PECAN field campaign will provide us with valuable insights—and improve our ability to save lives and property through more accurate forecasts.”

The PECAN field campaign will involve scientists, students, and support staff from eight research laboratories and 14 universities. The $13.5 million project is largely funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), which contributed $10.6 million. Additional support is provided by NOAA, NASA, and the U.S. Department of Energy.

Nighttime storm triggers
Once the sun goes down, the Earth and its lower atmosphere usually loses heat and becomes more stable, an environment not so favorable for supporting thunderstorms.  In the Great Plains, however, many summer storms form after sunset, and sometimes without an obvious trigger.

PECAN scientists are interested in large complexes of thunderstorms called Mesoscale Convective Systems that can grow overnight, last for hours and often produce severe and hazardous weather. They will investigate how a low-level river of air triggers thunderstorms and supports storm evolution, what causes storms to grow into MCSs, and how MCSs respond to the surrounding environment.

In addition, PECAN researchers will test their hypotheses about how deep waves in the atmosphere form and ripple across the plains, like what happens with water when a stone is thrown in a pond, causing new storms to form after sunset. One type of atmospheric ripple is called a “bore.” Thunderstorms can create bores, but bores can also cause a thunderstorm to suddenly intensify. PECAN is the first modern campaign to study the role of bores and how they trigger and support Mesoscale Convective Systems.

Armada of instruments
More than 20 NOAA researchers and students will be responsible for gathering data with multiple instruments including the NOAA-X-Pol, a dual-pol mobile radar, two mobile balloon launch vehicles, and two “mobile mesonet” vehicles equipped with weather instruments. New to the fleet is the Collaborative Lower Atmosphere Mobile Profiling System (CLAMPS) designed by NSSL researchers to meet many of NOAA’s and its National Weather Service’s needs for lower atmosphere temperature, humidity and wind profiles. Additionally, one of the three aircraft participating in PECAN will be a NOAA Lockheed WP-3D Orion aircraft, best known for its hurricane hunting missions.

Unique to the experiment is an observation strategy that uses PECAN Integrated Sounding Array (PISA) stations to provide temperature, humidity, and wind profiles about every five minutes. The Department of Energy will provide six out of the eight ground-based upward-looking infrared spectrometer instruments. Dave Turner, NSSL scientist and PECAN steering committee member, will coordinate their operation.

Deploying in the dark
The campaign is based in Hays, Kansas, and will begin each day at 8 a.m. CDT.  A team of meteorologists, including retired forecasters from NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center, will work on a forecast for the upcoming night. At 3 p.m., scientists will use the forecast to determine where across northern Oklahoma, central Kansas, or south-central Nebraska to deploy their mobile resources. Teams will then ferry the instruments to the target area, set up, and collect data from dusk until after midnight. When the observation period is complete, they will ferry the instruments back to the base in Hays. A better understanding of these storms will have relevance for areas beyond the Great Plains, because clustered nighttime thunderstorms are common in various regions scattered across the globe.

Share this: